houzz interior design ideas

The kitchen work triangle design concept has been around for a long time, apparently since the 1940’s, and has been used since then to create kitchens with efficient design. Based on time-motion studies, the kitchen triangle considers the proximity of the cooking area, food preparation/sink area and the food storage area/fridge freezer, to one another.

Have you ever been in a friend’s kitchen and watched them walk miles whilst preparing a meal? Sometimes the fridge/freezer is located a long way from the food preparation area, or the sink is inconveniently remote from the cooking area. My grandmother’s vast farmhouse kitchen may have had plenty of space, my theory is she kept fit by all the walking she had to do around that room in order to create three meals a day for a huge family. She could have benefited from highly experienced kitchen designers like Beau-Port’s team of Mark Johnson and Jacob Johnson.

The aim of the kitchen triangle is to keep all the major workstations near the cook, but without having them so close that they cramp the cook’s movement and efficiency.

Mrs. Courtier's In Frame Shaker Kitchen in Farrow & Ball Green Blue & Wimborne White

“Mark’s problem solving and attention to detail was enormously helpful and his very calm manner meant everything ran so smoothly…” Mrs Courtier – Bentworth, Hampshire.

This is where using an experienced designer is essential as it is not only about getting the kitchen triangle right for the size and shape of the kitchen, but also to be able to take into account all of the other important aspects of kitchen design, including how everything else flows around the essential elements of the kitchen.

For example, Beau-Port designed a kitchen that was the central part of a Georgian style village house, that had numerous doors leading off of it. The client had the benefit of a spacious kitchen with combined dining area leading to a family room and they wanted a designer who could face the challenge of creating a kitchen in a space that has five doorways – including a large set of patio doors.

 

Kathryn Courtier from Hampshire, is delighted with the design that Mark came up with for her Beau-Port Shaker style kitchen and commented: “We needed drastic help, I could have researched kitchens for the rest of my life, but what I needed was an expert like Mark who helped to guide us and find the best way of laying out a room with so many doors in and out of it and so many walkways through it. The previous kitchen had real ‘bottle necks’ and Mark cleverly designed the layout to give us more fluid space all the way around the kitchen, with nothing obstructing the walkways through the area into the family room and outside.”
Smaller galley shaped kitchens can also be an issue when trying to create the perfectly efficient work triangle, often due to difficulties fitting everything into a small space. But this is not an issue for good kitchen designers. Working on a historic village home in North East Hampshire, Beau-Port designer Mark Johnson created the perfect kitchen triangle in a relatively small, narrow space, skilfully fitting the hand-made bespoke Shaker style units around the historic beams of the building, while at the same time creating more storage space for the client.
Limited space in their previous kitchen had always been an issue for this Beau-Port client and even though Mark was restricted to keeping the same footprint of the kitchen, he was able to create additional storage space and work space. “Mark managed to create a lot more storage space by reducing the depth of the plinths and gaining greater depth to the cupboards, squeezing out every little bit of space and that is the great thing about having the kitchen bespoke and tailored.”

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